Using the service configuration utility

If you don't like typing the chkconfig commands, you can use a graphical service configuration utility program to configure the services. To run the service configuration utility, log in as root and choose Main MenuOSystem SettingsOServer SettingsOServices from the GNOME or KDE desktop. You can then turn services on or off from the Service Configuration window (as in Figure 1-2).

Figure 1-2:

From the Service Configuration window, you can set services to start automatically at boot time.

Figure 1-2:

From the Service Configuration window, you can set services to start automatically at boot time.

Book VIII Chapter 1

The service configuration utility shows the names of services in a scrolling list. Each line in the list shows the name of a service with a box in front of the name. A check mark in the box indicates that the service is already selected to start at boot time for the current run level. When the dialog box first appears, many services are already selected.

You can scroll up and down the list and click the box to select or deselect a service. If you click the box, the check mark alternately turns on and off. To find out more about a service, click the service name and a brief description appears in the right-hand side of the window. For example, Figure 1-2 shows the help text for the atd service. Additionally, the utility also shows you whether the selected service is currently running or not.

After you select all the servers you want to start when the system boots, click Save on the toolbar to save the changes. Then choose FileOQuit to exit.

By default, the service configuration utility configures the selected services for the current run level. That means if you're selecting services from the graphical desktop, the system is in run level 5 and the services you configure are set to start at run level 5. If you want to set up the services for a different level, select that run level from the Edit Runlevel menu.

Table 1-1 shows a list of the services, along with a brief description of each one. The first column shows the name of the service, which is the same as the name of the program that has to run to provide the service. You may not see all these services listed when you run the service configuration utility on your system because the exact list of services depends on what is installed on your Fedora Core system.

Table 1-1 shows a list of the services, along with a brief description of each one. The first column shows the name of the service, which is the same as the name of the program that has to run to provide the service. You may not see all these services listed when you run the service configuration utility on your system because the exact list of services depends on what is installed on your Fedora Core system.

Table 1-1

Some Common Services in Fedora Core

Service Name

Description

acpid

Listens to Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI)

events from the kernel and notifies other programs when such

events occur. ACPI events can occur when the kernel puts the

computer into a low-power state (for example, standby mode) to

save energy.

aeplQQQ

Loads and unloads the driver for the Accelerated Encryption

Processing card called the AEP1000, which can do encryption

fast (use this service only if you have the card installed in your

system).

anacron

Executes commands scheduled to run periodically.

apmd

Monitors the Advanced Power Management (APM) BIOS and

logs the status of electric power (AC or battery backup).

atd

Runs commands scheduled by the at and cron commands.

Service Name

Description

autofs

Automatically mounts file systems (for example, when you

insert a CD-ROM in the CD-ROM drive).

bcm5820

Loads and unloads the driver for Broadcom's BCM5820

Cryptonet SSL (secure sockets layer) accelerator chip (use this

service only if you have the hardware installed).

cpuspeed

Dynamically adjusts the CPU's frequency (the clock speed) and

voltage to slow it down in order to conserve power and reduce

heat. Controlling the CPU frequency can help increase a laptop

computer's battery life and reduce the heat it generates. This

daemon is configured through the configuration file /etc/

cpuspeed.conf.

crond

Runs user-specified programs according to a periodic schedule

the crontab command set.

cups

Runs the Common UNIX Printing System (CUPS) daemon

(cupsd).

cups-lpd

Enables applications to use the legacy LPD (line printer

daemon) protocol to communicate with CUPS

finger

Answers finger protocol requests (for user information, such

as login name and last login time). You have to enable xinetd

for this service to run.

firstboot

Runs the first time you boot Fedora Core and enables you to set

the date and time, create user accounts, and install other

CD-ROMs.

gpm

Enables use of mouse in text-mode screens.

httpd

The Apache World Wide Web (WWW) server.

innd

The InterNetNews daemon —the Internet news server you can

use to support local newsgroups on your system.

ipop3

Allows remote POP3 (Post Office Protocol version 3) clients to

download mail messages. You have to enable xinetd for this

service to run.

iptables

Automates a packet-filtering firewall with iptables.

irda

Supports communications with IrDA-compliant infrared devices

in Linux (IrDA is a standard for infrared wireless communication

at speeds ranging from 2400bps to 4Mbps).

irqbalance

Distributes interrupts to the processors in a multiprocessor

system so as to balance the load among the processors.

isdn

Starts and stops ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network)

services — a digital communication service over regular phone

lines (enable only if you have ISDN service).

kudzu

Probes for new hardware and configures changed hardware.

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Book VIII Chapter 1

Table 1-1 (continued)

Service Name

Description

lisa

Starts and stops the LAN Information Server (LISa) daemon that

can display information about hosts in the local area network

(LAN) by broadcasting on TCP port 7741. To find out more about

LISa, visit lisa-home.sourceforge.net.

messagebus

Runs the D-BUS daemon that enables applications to receive

notification of system events, such as the addition of a new

hardware device. To find out more about D-BUS, see

www.freedesktop.org/software/dbus/.

named

A server for the Domain Name System (DNS) that translates

host names into IP addresses. You can run a copy on your

system if you want.

netfs

Enables you to mount and unmount all network file systems

(NFS, Samba, and Netware).

network

Enables you to activate or deactivate all network interfaces

configured to start at system boot time.

nfs

Enables sharing of file systems specified in the /etc/

exports file using the Network File System (NFS) protocol.

nfslock

Provides file-locking capability for file systems exported using

the Network File System (NFS) protocol, so other systems (run

ning NFS) can share files from your system.

ntpd

The server for Network Time Protocol version 4 (NTPv4) that is

used for synchronizing clocks on computers in a network.

pcmcia

Provides support for PCMCIA devices.

portmap

Server used by any software that relies on Remote Procedure

Calls (RPC). For example, NFS requires the portmap service.

postgresql

Starts or stops the PostgreSQL server that handles database

requests. (PostgreSQL is a free database that comes with

Fedora Core.)

random

Server needed to generate high-quality random numbers on the

Fedora Core system.

rawdevices

Assigns raw devices to block devices (needed for applications

such as Oracle).

readahead

Loads into memory programs used during startup before they

are needed. This service makes the system start up faster.

rhnsd

Periodically connects to the Red Hat Network Services servers

to check for updates and notifications.

rpcgssd

Server that manages the Generic Security Service (GSS) for

NFS version 4 clients and provides security for protocols that

use Remote Procedure Call (RPC).

rpcidmapd rpcidmapd

Server that maps user name to user ID and group ID numbers. This is needed to support NFS version 4.

Service Name

Description

rpcsvcgssd

Server that manages security for NFS version 4 servers and

provides security for RPC-based protocols such as NFS.

rsync

Server that supports remote copying of files. You have to enable

xinetd for this service to run.

saslauthd

Supports authentication using the Cyrus-SASL (Simple

Authentication and Security Layer) software.

sendmail

Moves mail messages from one machine to another. Start this

service if you want to send mail from your Fedora Core system.

If you don't plan to use your Fedora Core system as a mail

server, don't start the sendmail server because it can slow

down the booting process and consume unnecessary

resources.

services

Lists active services that are being managed by xinetd. This

server requires xinetd to run.

sgi_fam

Implements a file alternation monitor (FAM) that can be used to

get reports when files change.

smartd

Monitors the Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting

Technology (SMART) system built into many ATA, IDE, and SCSI-

3 hard drives. This daemon can monitor the reliability of the

hard drive and predict drive failures, and can perform various

self-tests of the drives.

smb

Starts and stops the Samba smbd and nmbd services that sup

port LAN Manager services on a Fedora Core system.

snmpd

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) service used

for network-management functions.

snmptrapd

Receives and logs SNMP messages known as TRAP and

INFORM messages.

squid

A caching server for Internet objects — anything that can be

accessed through HTTP and FTP.

sshd

Server for the OpenSSH (Secure Shell) secure remote login

facility.

syslog

Service used by many other programs (including other services)

to log various error and status messages in a log file (usually,

the /var/log/messages file). Always run this service.

telnet

Server that supports TELNET remote login sessions. You have to

enable xinetd for this service to run.

tux

The kernel-based HTTP server.

udev

Manages device nodes dynamically. You can use it to manage

the device files in the /dev directory by editing udev's config-

uration file /etc/udev/udev.conf .

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Table 1-1 (continued)

Service Name

Description

vncserver

Starts and stops the Virtual Network Computing (VNC) desktop

by running or stopping the X VNC server (Xvnc). By running the

VNC server, you can remotely control a Fedora Core computer

from any other computer on the network (you do need a VNC

viewer on the computers from which you want to access the

Fedora Core system's X display).

vsftpd

Very Secure FTP daemon for file transfers using the File

Transfer Protocol (FTP).

winbind

Starts and stops the Samba winbindd server that provides a

name-switch capability similar to that provided by the

/etc/nsswitch.conf file.

xfs

Server that starts and stops the X Font Server.

xinetd

The Internet super server, a replacement for the older i netd.

It starts other Internet services, such as TELNET and FTP, when

ever they are needed.

ypbind

Service that runs on Network Information System (NIS) clients

and binds the clients to a NIS domain. You don't have to start

ypbind unless you're using NIS.

yppasswdd

Service needed for password changes in Network Information

System (NIS). You don't have to start yppasswdd unless

you're using NIS.

ypserv

The server for Network Information System (NIS). You don't

have to start ypserv unless you're using NIS.

ypxfrd

A server that helps ypserv. Start this service only if you're

using Network Information System (NIS).

yum

Runs Yum daily to update the software packages installed on

your system. Yum is a program updater, like Up2date.

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