Using Named Pipes and Sockets

When you want to allow one process to send information to another process, you can simply pipe ( ) the output from one to the input of the other. However, to provide a presence in the file system from which a process can communicate with other processes, you can create named pipes or sockets. Named pipes are typically used for interprocess communication on the local system, while sockets can be used for processes to communicate over a network. Named pipes and sockets are often set up by...

Working with Users and Groups

During most Linux installation procedures, you are asked to assign a password to the root user (for system administration). Then you might be asked to create a user name of your choice and assign a password to that as well (for everyday computer use). We encourage you to always log in as a regular user and only su or sudo to the root account when necessary. When Linux is installed, you can use commands or graphical tools to add more users, modify user accounts, and assign and change passwords....

Using Text Based Email Clients

Most Mail User Agents (MUAs) are GUI-based these days. So if you began using e-mail in the past decade or so, you probably think of Evolution, Kmail, Thunderbird, or (on Windows systems) Outlook when it comes to e-mail clients. On the first Unix and Linux systems, however, e-mail was handled by text-based applications. If you find yourself needing to check e-mail on a remote server or other text-based environment, venerable text-based mail clients are available and still quite useful. In fact,...

Changing Running Processes

Even after a process is running, you can change its behavior in different ways. With the renice command, shown earlier, you can adjust a running process's priority in your system's scheduler. With the nice command, you can determine the default priority and also set a higher or lower priority at the time you launch a process. Another way you can change how a running process behaves is to send a signal to that process. The kill and killall commands can be used to send signals to running...