EISA

The extended ISA (EISA) bus was developed by Compaq and other x86 PC vendors as an alternative to IBM's MCA bus. Unlike MCA, EISA is backward compatible with ISA. You can plug an ISA card into an EISA slot, and it generally works. A 32-bit bus that runs at 8.33MHz, EISA is capable of maximum transfer rates of approximately 33MB/s. This speed is adequate even for many modern functions, although not all. Some SCSI host adapters, for instance, can transfer data at 40MB/s, 80MB/s, or higher; and some EIDE interfaces are capable of 66MB/s speeds.

Chapter 2

Figure 2.5

The General setup area of the Linux kernel configuration includes options relating to Linux's handling of busses, including the MCA and PCI busses.

Figure 2.5

The General setup area of the Linux kernel configuration includes options relating to Linux's handling of busses, including the MCA and PCI busses.

EISA experienced a brief period of acceptance, if not gushing popularity, in the early 80486 era. EISA was most popular as a bus for SCSI host adapters, although other devices were also available in EISA format. The bus acquired a reputation for moderately difficult configuration, however, and it was more expensive than competing busses. In the end, other busses surpassed EISA in popularity, and it's not available on modern motherboards.

Linux supports the EISA bus, and includes drivers for a variety of EISA cards, including popular EISA SCSI host adapters such as the Adaptec 1742. If you have an old EISA computer on which you want to run Linux, you stand a good chance of getting it working.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
The Ultimate Computer Repair Guide

The Ultimate Computer Repair Guide

Read how to maintain and repair any desktop and laptop computer. This Ebook has articles with photos and videos that show detailed step by step pc repair and maintenance procedures. There are many links to online videos that explain how you can build, maintain, speed up, clean, and repair your computer yourself. Put the money that you were going to pay the PC Tech in your own pocket.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment