Tools Menu

The first item on the Tools menu, Run Command, presents you with a dialog box containing a line in which you can type the name of the program you want to run or the web page you want to view. In some cases this may be a faster method than searching through menus for the item. This same dialog box is available in the main K menu as well.

Figure 3.9: Tools Menu

The Open Terminal item opens a Konsole terminal window, which is a textbased user interface. Almost everything that can be done by means of a mouse, windows, and icons can be done from this simple little terminal— and in many cases done more quickly. The disadvantage is that it takes some time to learn the necessary commands; that little blinking cursor isn't exactly intuitive. For more information, see Chapter 13.

Figure 3.9: Tools Menu

The Open Terminal item opens a Konsole terminal window, which is a textbased user interface. Almost everything that can be done by means of a mouse, windows, and icons can be done from this simple little terminal— and in many cases done more quickly. The disadvantage is that it takes some time to learn the necessary commands; that little blinking cursor isn't exactly intuitive. For more information, see Chapter 13.

Find File allows you to search for files and directories. The Look In bar at the bottom of the dialog box allows you to enter the directory in which you want to search. If you don't know exactly which directory the file is in, you can enable searching in subdirectories. To narrow your search, you can use the Date Range tab or the Advanced tab. Enter the filename in the Named bar and the directory (parent or subdirectory) that you expect the file to be in, or use the Browse button.

Figure 3.10: Finding Files

The Find File utility works a little differently than similar programs in other operating systems. You will notice an asterisk in the Named bar where you enter text. The asterisk represents a wildcard for any character or even no character. For instance, if you don't know the filename in its entirety, but remember that its name begins with "report," you can enter report* in the Named bar, and the files returned are all those starting with "report" and ending in anything. If you want to search for all of

Figure 3.10: Finding Files

The Find File utility works a little differently than similar programs in other operating systems. You will notice an asterisk in the Named bar where you enter text. The asterisk represents a wildcard for any character or even no character. For instance, if you don't know the filename in its entirety, but remember that its name begins with "report," you can enter report* in the Named bar, and the files returned are all those starting with "report" and ending in anything. If you want to search for all of the PDF files on your system (or in the specified directory), type *.pdf, and you get all files beginning with anything and ending with the file extension .pdf. If you don't know the first or last characters of the filename, you can place an asterisk both before and after those for which you are searching. For instance, typing *report* returns all files with "report" anywhere in the filename.

The Create Image Gallery item allows you to create a web page of thumbnail images that link automatically to the full-size version. Open a display of image files, select Create Image Gallery and any preferences from the dialog box, and the page is created.

Figure 3.11: Create Image Gallery

The last item, Execute Shell Command, is similar to the Run Command item. Again, see Chapter 13 for more details on shell commands.

Figure 3.11: Create Image Gallery

The last item, Execute Shell Command, is similar to the Run Command item. Again, see Chapter 13 for more details on shell commands.

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