Changing Gnomes Mime Type Mappings

Like KDE, GNOME relies on MIME types to determine what type of data a file contains and, therefore, what to do when you double-click an icon. GNOME ships with an extensive database of MIME types and associations to applications and filename extensions, but if you need to modify this database, you can. To do so, pick Applications O Desktop Preferences O Advanced O File Types and Programs from the Menu Panel. (This tool's location can vary substantially from one distribution to another, though.) The result is the File Types and Programs window shown in Figure 6.8. Like the equivalent KDE tool, this program organizes document types into categories; but the File Types and Programs tool's categories don't exactly correspond to MIME types.

Figure 6.8: The File Types and Programs tool enables you to edit GNOME'S file type associations.

If you can find an entry for your file type, double-click it or click it and then click Edit. The result is the Edit File Type dialog box shown in Figure 6.9. You can enter or modify the description, MIME type, associated filename extensions, and so on. GNOME uses an internal database of applications associated with common file types, but if your file type isn't handled correctly, you can enter the path to an appropriate program in the Program to Run field. If the appropriate program is text-mode, be sure to check the Run in Terminal check box.

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Figure 6.9: You can modify MIME types using the Edit File Type dialog box.

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