GUI Process Management Tools

The ps, top, and other text-mode utilities can be extremely useful, and they are very powerful tools in the hands of somebody who understands them. Less experienced users, though, may feel more comfortable with GUI process-management tools. Even experienced users may like some of the features of GUI tools. Linux provides these GUI tools, of course.

One of these utilities is the GNOME System Monitor, which is shown in Figure 14.3. You can launch this program by typing gnome-system-monitor or by selecting it from somewhere on the GNOME menu on most distributions. By default, the GNOME System Monitor displays processes using a tree-like view, but you can collapse parts of the tree by clicking the triangle to the left of a process's name. You can sort by different criteria by clicking the header names, such as User or Memory in Figure 14.3. If you right-click a process, a context menu appears from which you can change the process's priority, kill the process, and so on.

Figure 14.3: The GNOME System Monitor is a typical GUI process management tool.

The System Monitor tab in the GNOME System Monitor provides access to additional information and features, including information on the demand for CPU time, memory, swap space, and disk space. Overall, the GNOME System Monitor is roughly comparable to top in its features.

KDE, like GNOME, provides a GUI process-management tool: KDE System Guard.

This program is accessible from somewhere on the KDE menu, or can be launched by typing ksysguard. This tool can produce a process table akin to that displayed by the GNOME System Monitor, as shown in Figure 14.4. It can also produce graphs of resource use (on the System Load tab) and can display information on many other system resources. If you want to see only the process list, you can use a tool that KDE System Guard uses internally, KPM. You can launch this program by typing kpm in an xterm window or by selecting the process management option from the KDE menu. Right-clicking a process enables you to perform actions on it, such as killing it or changing its priority.

Figure 14.4: The KDE System Guard provides process monitoring tools and additional system information displays.

Note Like most programs that ship with KDE and GNOME, you can use KDE System Guard, KPM, and the GNOME System Monitor in environments other than the ones with which they're associated.

Figure 14.4: The KDE System Guard provides process monitoring tools and additional system information displays.

Note Like most programs that ship with KDE and GNOME, you can use KDE System Guard, KPM, and the GNOME System Monitor in environments other than the ones with which they're associated.

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