Using the Pico and nano Editors

Pico is a popular, very small text editor, distributed as part of the Pine e-mail client. Although Pico is free, it is not truly open source. Therefore, many Linux distributions don't offer Pico. Instead, most distributions offer an open source clone of Pico called nano (nano's another editor). SUSE provides both Pico and nano as optional packages. This section describes the nano editor. nano (represented by the nano command) is a compact text editor that runs from the shell, but is...

Doing Remote Login and Tunneling with SSH

Linux's big brother Unix grew up on university networks. At a time when the only users of these networks were students and professors, and with networks mostly isolated from each other, there was little need for security. Applications and protocols that were designed in those times (the 1970s and 1980s) reflect that lack of concern for encryption and authentication. SMTP is a perfect example of that. This is also true of the first generation of Unix remote tools telnet, ftp (file transfer...

Using Text Based Email Clients

Most Mail User Agents (MUAs) are GUI-based these days. So if you began using e-mail in the past decade or so, you probably think of Evolution, Kmail, Thunderbird, or (on Windows systems) Outlook when it comes to e-mail clients. On the first Unix and Linux systems, however, e-mail was handled by text-based applications. If you find yourself needing to check e-mail on a remote server or other text-based environment, venerable text-based mail clients are available and still quite useful. In fact,...

Changing Running Processes

Even after a process is running, you can change its behavior in different ways. With the renice command, shown earlier, you can adjust a running process's priority in your system's scheduler. With the nice command, you can determine the default priority and also set a higher or lower priority at the time you launch a process. Another way you can change how a running process behaves is to send a signal to that process. The kill and killall commands can be used to send signals to running...