Checking NTP Synchronization Status

After you have started the NTP service on all the computers in your network, you probably want to know whether it is working correctly. The first tool to use is the ntptrace command, which will give you an overview of the current synchronization status. When using this command, you should be aware that it will always take some time to establish NTP time synchronization. This delay is because usually an NTP client will synchronize only every 16 seconds, and it may fail in establishing correct synchronization when it tries the first time. However, usually it should take no longer than making a cup of coffee to establish NTP time synchronization.

You can use the ntpq command to query for NTP service status. This command offers its own interactive interface from which the status of any NTP service can be requested. Like when using the FTP client, you can use a couple of commands to do "remote control" on the NTP server. In this interface, you can use the help command to see a list of available commands, as shown in Figure 20-2.

IPJ [email protected]:~ - Shell

- Konsole

*

Session Edit

View Bookmarks Settings Help

SFO:~ # ntpq

-

ntpq> help

Commands available:

addvars

associations authenticate

cl

clearvars

clocklist

clockvar

cooked

cv

debug

delay

exit

help

host

hostnames

key id

keytype

lassociations

lopeers

1passociations

lpeers

mreadlist

mreadvar

mrl

mrv

ntpversion

opeers

passociations

passwd

peers

poll

pstatus

quit

raw

readlist

readvar

rl

rmvars

rv

showvars

timeout

version

writelist

writevar

ntpq> □

g] | IPJ Shell

0

Figure 20-2. You can use the ntpq interface as a remote control to your NTP server.

As an alternative, you can run ntpq with some command-line options. For example, the command ntpq -p provides an overview of the current synchronization status. The result of this command displays several parameters:

• remote displays the name of the other server.

• refid displays the IP address of the server with which you are synchronizing.

• st displays the stratum used by the other server.

• t displays the type of clock used on the other server. L stands for local clock; if an Internet clock is used, you will find a u.

• when displays the number of seconds since the last poll.

• poll displays the number of seconds used between two polls.

• reach displays the number of times the other server has been contacted successfully.

• delay indicates the time between an NTP request issues and the answer given on that request.

• offset displays the difference in seconds between the time on your local computer and on the NTP server.

• jitter displays the error rate in your local clock, expressed in seconds.

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Responses

  • jackson
    How i can check the ntpd status in suse linux?
    6 years ago
  • meaza
    How to check synchronize time in command suse linux?
    6 years ago
  • almaz
    How to check ntp settings in suse?
    1 month ago

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