Disk devsda 823 GB 82348277760 bytes 255 heads 63 sectorstrack 10011 cylinders

Units = cylinders

of 16065

* 512 =

8225280 bytes

Device Boot

Start

End

Blocks

Id

System

/dev/sda1 *

1

13

104391

83

Linux

/dev/sda2

14

268

2048287+

83

Linux

/dev/sda3

269

395

1020127+

82

Linux swap

/dev/sda4

396

10011

77240520

f

Win95 Ext'd (LBA)

/dev/sda5

396

2945

20482843+

83

Linux

/dev/sda6

2946

4857

15358108+

83

Linux

/dev/sda7

4858

6132

10241406

83

Linux

/dev/sda8

6133

10011

31158036

83

Linux

The output of fdisk -l shows you the size of the disk, how many cylinders it has, and the disk's block and cylinder size. You do not need to use these low-level measurements to create your partitions, however, because fdisk can use human-readable measurements (MB and GB) to calculate the partition layout. You should use human-readable sizes when creating partitions, as this is the easiest and safest way to create new partitions.

PSJjS^j^^J As you can see from the output of fdisk -l, shown in Listing 3-1, the partitions within

- - - ,t .■ a disk are numbered incrementally. As a partition is added to a disk, the partition number is increased. As you can see from the fdisk -l output, you have eight partitions, 1-8. Partition 4 is not a primary partition but is the definition for the extended partition that actually houses logical partitions 5, 6, 7, and 8. You can determine this by looking at the partition name or by comparing the starting and ending block numbers for these partitions.

To set up partitions using fdisk, you need to specify the disk itself on the command line. After fdisk has loaded, you will be dropped to its command line to continue working on the disk. At any time while in the fdisk command prompt, entering m (for "menu") followed by Return will display a help screen that lists all available fdisk commands.

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