Getting a File from a T610 over Bluetooth

thinkpad:- # obexftp -b 00:0E:07:24:7E:D5 --get telecom/devinfo.txt No custom transport Connecting...bt: 1 done

Receiving telecom/devinfo.txt... done Disconnecting...done

In this use of obexftp, we made sure it used Bluetooth (-b), the Bluetooth address, the process (get), and the file we wanted to transfer. In this case, the file devinfo.txt will be downloaded to the current directory.

To have full communication with a Bluetooth device, you need to pair with it. This may involve setting the device to accept a pairing, and in some cases entering a four-digit PIN number.

KDE includes the kbluetooth tools. These allow you use the Konquerer browser to view the filesystem on a paired device, such as a phone (see Figure 15-3).

Also included in KDE's Bluetooth suite is a "push client,'' kbtobexclient, which allows you to send a file to a connected Bluetooth device (see Figure 15-4).

The KDE Bluetooth suite includes another very smart program: kbluelock. This locks the screen with the KDE screensaver if a selected Bluetooth device disappears. So if you always have your phone in your pocket, walking away from your desk will lock your screen.

Although the kbluetooth tools let you see the filesystem on a phone where images and sound recordings are held, they are not capable of viewing the contacts list, call records, and text messages stored on it. However, there is a nice program that is also available in the openSUSE distribution in the online repositories called Wammu, which can do all these things, as well as saving a backup of your phone's contact list to a file (see Figure 15-5).

FIGURE 15-3

Viewing the filesystem on a Bluetooth device

FIGURE 15-3

Viewing the filesystem on a Bluetooth device

FIGURE 15-4

Sending a file to a Nokia phone using KDE's push client

FIGURE 15-4

Sending a file to a Nokia phone using KDE's push client

FIGURE 15-5

Viewing mobile phone call records using Wammu

FIGURE 15-5

Viewing mobile phone call records using Wammu

You can do a huge amount of things with Bluetooth in Linux, and it all depends on what device you are communicating with.

As we have talked about throughout this chapter, networking is core to the use of Linux. Unless you are using your system as a standalone machine (for a desktop, for example), you need to be able to configure networking to be able to connect yourself to the outside world or other machines on your network. With the recent addition of wireless technology to new laptops (wireless Ethernet and Bluetooth), you'll find yourself relying more and more on these new technologies to be able to carry out your day-to-day tasks.

Every modern Linux distribution offers a way to configure, at the very least, the network card in your machine. YaST also enables you to configure your wireless connection and modem through the same interface that we have talked about. This is just another arrow to the rather large bow that YaST provides you.

Do not think that you must know all of the options for ifconfig or route or feel compelled to use these tools for your network configuration work. It is certainly a lot faster to configure networking with YaST. However, this chapter has shown it is important that you understand what happens under the hood and how to use these very important tools to configure and diagnose your network.

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