Mount workiso mint o loop

You can then unmount the image (umount /mnt) and then burn the image to CD using cdrecord (or wodim) from the command line or KDE's k3b tool.

In this chapter, we have attempted to introduce the most common commands and concepts that you will need when working with a SUSE Linux system. Much of the material that has been covered here will become clearer as it is used again in other chapters of the book.

It is often said that the only way to learn a language is to use it. In the same way, if the commands and ideas in this chapter were new to you, the best advice is to use them, experiment with them, and gain knowledge by experience, with the examples in this chapter as a guide.

artitions are physical or logical portions of a disk; a filesystem is the logical arrangement of data on a physical or logical partition so that your computer system can access and store data there.

During the installation of SUSE Linux, by default, at least two partitions will be created: a root partition and a swap partition. There are important reasons why you might want to create more than these two partitions. It is also possible that you want to boot more than one operating system on the same computer, so you need to retain pre-existing partitions. For all these reasons, an understanding of how partitioning works is essential for a Linux user.

Linux gives you far more control over the partitions you use for your system than Windows does. As a result, of course, it also gives you more opportunities to make mistakes. But if you have a good understanding of partitioning, you can create a disk layout that is most efficient for your purposes.

The next few sections cover partitions — how to use them, why you use them, and where you use them. Later in this chapter, you will use this basic knowledge about partitions to create a filesystem in which you can actually create and store files and directories.

IN THIS CHAPTER

Creating partitions

Selecting and creating filesystems

Mounting filesystems

Unmounting filesystems

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