Figure 163 The Process Listing view of the System Monitor

File Edit View Help

Processes

Resources

Devices

Load averages for the last 1, 5, 15 minutes: 0.85, 0.55, 0.60

Process Name T

Status

Fiesident Memory

beagled

Sleeping

32,8

MiB

0

bonobo-activation-server

Sleeping

3,6

MiB

0

J clock-applet

Sleeping

12,8

MiB

0

dbus-daemon

Sleeping

940,0

KiB

0

dbus-launch

Sleeping

692,0

KiB

0

esd

Sleeping

4.4

MiB

0

gconfd-2

Sleeping

5,2

MiB

0

gnome-cups-icon

Sleeping

9,7

MiB

0

gnome-keyring-daemon

Sleeping

832,0

KiE

0

gnome-panel

Sleeping

21,9

MiB

0

nnnmp-nnwPr-mRnanpr

Slppninn

K 6

MiR

n

<M - ■ -

End Proce;

The System Monitor menu item (shown in Figure 16.3) is found in the System, Administration menu. You can launch it from the command line as follows:

$ gksudo gnome-system-monitor

From the Process Listing view (chosen via the tab in the upper-left portion of the window), select a process and click on More Info at the bottom left of the screen to display details on that process at the bottom of the display. You can select from three views to filter the display, available in the dropdown View list: All Processes, My Processes (those you alone own), or Active Processes (all processes that are active).

Choose Hidden Processes under the Edit command accessible from the top of the display to show any hidden processes (those that the kernel does not enable the normal monitoring tools to see). Select any process and kill it with End Process.

The processes can be reniced by selecting Edit, Change Priority. The View selection from the menu bar also provides a memory map. In the Resource Monitor tab, you can view a moving graph representing CPU and memory usage (see Figure 16.4).

Figure 16.4. The Graph view of the System Monitor. It shows CPU usage, memory/swap usage, and disk usage. To get this view, select the

Resource Monitor tab.

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment