Introduction

This book was born out of an experiment carried out when Ubuntu 6.06 was released in 2006. Back then Ubuntu was rougher around the edges than it is today. Getting MP3 files to play took some effort. Only a handful of wifi cards worked out of the box and the rest had to be wrangled into working.

So I wrote 25 tips to get Ubuntu working the way I felt it should. I also looked at some cool things that could be done with Ubuntu—the kind of things that wowed people passing by your computer. Everything was kept simple because I knew a high proportion of Ubuntu users had switched from Windows, where things were done differently. Many of the tips were pulled from my award-winning book, Beginning Ubuntu Linux.

I put the tips on my website and then posted a link to the page on the Digg.com social networking website. Within hours it was in the top 10 links for that day. My site was actually knocked offline by the sheer volume of visitors.

The popularity of the tips was partly because Ubuntu has always been popular with the Digg.com crowd, but there was a more important reason. People wanted Ubuntu to "just work". They brought with them the expectations of Windows users. They didn't want to make any compromises, either in terms of usability or function. And they wanted to learn how Ubuntu worked. They wanted that above all, in fact.

UbuntuKung Fu is for those people, and others like them. It's an Ubuntu book for the rest of us.

In its pages you'll find over 300 tips that:

1. Make Ubuntu more usable for newcomers and experienced users alike;

2. Point out cool and often extraordinary things that Ubuntu can do;

3. Show how Ubuntu can be fun.

Along the way you'll pick up many skills that will make you a more proficient Ubuntu user.

If you'd like to share some of the tips from this book on your blog then feel free. I'm not sure my publishers will be too happy if you take liberties, but sharing a handful of tips you've found useful with others can only be a good thing. If you do, it would be great if you could link to http://www.ubuntukungfu.org, the community site that partners this book (if you're feeling generous, you might also link to the book's official webpage—http://pragprog.com/titles/ktuk).

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment