Make Windows permanently available

Give the boot menu a wallpaper

1. Choose a picture and then load it into the GIMP (right-click and select Open With ^ Open with "GIMP Image Editor"); you might like to know that the default Ubuntu desktop wallpapers are stored in /usr/share/backgrounds. You should select a picture that's roughly in 4:3 ratio, such as a digital camera snap. Don't select very tall or broad images—they won't work.

2. Right-click the image within GIMP and select Image ^ Scale Image. In the Width box, type 640 and hit the [Tab] key. The Height box should then automatically change to 480. If it doesn't, click the small chain icon to the right of the Width and Height boxes, so that it changes to a broken chain icon. Then enter 480 into the Height box. Once done, click the Scale button.

3. Right-click the image again within The GIMP and select Image ^ Mode ^ Indexed. Ensure Generate Optimum Palette is selected, and then type 14 into the Maximum Number of Colors box. Then click the Convert button. The picture might now look ugly, but such a low color count is all the GRUB boot menu allows. You might want to try an alternative simpler image if you don't like what you see. Some nice Ubuntu-themed readymade boot menu wallpapers are available for download from https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ Artwork/Incoming/Hardy/Alternate/Grub.

4. Right-click the image again within GIMP and select File ^ Save As. Give the file a name in the Name box, and use the .xpm file extension. You might save the file as bootwallpaper.xpm, for example. Bear in mind that GIMP automatically detects the file type it should save the file as from the file extension. Click OK to select the default alpha values, if prompted.

5. Open a terminal window and type the following (this assumes the file was saved to the desktop):

$ sudo mkdir /boot/grub/splashimages $ gzip -/Desktop/bootwallaper.xpm

$ sudo mv -/Desktop/bootwallpaper.xpm.gz /boot/grub/splashimages

6. Replace bootwallpaper mentions above with the filename you chose.

7. Then open the boot menu file for editing in Gedit: $ gksu gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst

Look for the line that begins ## ## End Default Options ## and, below, add a new line that reads splashimage=(hd0,4)/boot/grub/splashimages/bootwallaper.xpm.gz.

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## memtest86=false

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## should update-grub adjust the value of the default booted system

## can be true

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# updatedefaultentry=false

## should update-grub add savedefault tc

the default options

## can be true

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# savedefault=false

## ## End Default Options ##

splashimage=(hd0,4)/boot/grub/splashimages/bootwallpaper.xpm.gz

title

Ubuntu 8.04, kernel 2.6.

24-19-generic

root

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kernel

/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.24-19-

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initrd

/boot/initrd.img-2.6.24-

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title

Ubuntu 8.04, kernel 2.6.

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root

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kernel

/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.24-19-

generic root=UUID=871508c8-262a

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initrd

/boot/initrd.img-2.6.24-

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title

Ubuntu 8.04, kernel 2.6.

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Figure 3.25: Editing the boot menu configuration file to add a wallpaper entry (see Tip 139, on page 180)

As above, replace bootwallpaper with the filename you chose. See Figure 3.25 for an example taken from my test PC. Save the file and then reboot to see the new wallpaper in action.

Note that the last step above assumes your computer is dual-booting with Windows. If Ubuntu is the only operating system on your computer, the line should read splashimage=(hd0/0)/boot/grub/splashimages/bootwallpaper.xpm.gz.

Access all removable storage from the command-line M 183

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