Reconfigure your graphics card from the groundup

If Ubuntu just hasn't got it right when it comes to your graphics card and/or monitor, you can configure things manually. To do so, open a terminal window and type gksu displayconfig-gtk. Settings relating to your monitor are located on the Screen tab, while you can change the graphics driver in use by selecting the Graphics Card tab. If you can't seem to get any driver to work, try clicking the Driver dropdown list, and then selecting VESA from the Choose Driver by Name dropdown list. VESA is a kind of failsafe driver that only uses the most primitive parts of a graphics card, and should allow you to get at least some kind of desktop visible, although performance will not be very good (video playback might stutter, for example).

21. This book was written using Hardy Heron (8.04) as a base. This is the first release of Ubuntu to use GVFS, a virtual file system layer. The goal of GVFS is to take care of all kinds of external storage so that everything is available in a uniform way to desktop users, but at the time of writing it's in its infancy and some devices—such as USB memory sticks—are still mounted in the old-fashioned way, in the /media folder. This is almost certain to change with the next release of Ubuntu.

Unlock the package database -^184

Don't forget that, if you have an nVidia card or certain ATI Radeon cards, you might want to select to use proprietary drivers. To do so, click System ^ Administration ^ Hardware Drivers. Then check Enable alongside the entry for your card and, once the driver installation has completed, reboot the computer. Often using a proprietary driver is the only way to get support for less usual screen resolutions, such as widescreen settings.

Have you ever received either of the following errors at the command-prompt when trying to install software?

dpkg: status database area is locked by another process Or

Could not get lock /var/lib/dpkg/lock - open (11 Resource temporarily unavailable)

Unable to lock the administration directory (/var/lib/dpkg/), is ^ another process using it?

Have you ever received either of the following errors at the command-prompt when trying to install software?

dpkg: status database area is locked by another process Or

Could not get lock /var/lib/dpkg/lock - open (11 Resource temporarily unavailable)

Unable to lock the administration directory (/var/lib/dpkg/), is ^ another process using it?

What it means is that another software installation application is open— probably Synaptic or Update Manager. Only one program can install software at any one time. You'll need to close any others to continue.

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